The Federalist

Picture of Alexander Hamilton

Picture of James Madison

Alexander Hamilton

James Madison

John Jay

 

The Federalist

The text of this version is primarily taken from the first collected 1788 "McLean edition", but spelling and punctuation have been modernized, and some glaring errors -- mainly printer's lapses -- have been corrected. The main heads have also been taken from that edition and a few later ones, except where the head was something like "The Same Subject Continued" we have repeated the previous heading and appended "(continued)", so that each document can better stand alone. We have been guided by the excellent edition by Jacob E. Cooke, Wesleyan University Press, 1961. The footnotes are those of the authors, except where the original edition used a variety of special typographical symbols for superscripts, we use numerals. Editors's footnotes are indicated by being preceded by the letter "E". The original typography used for emphasis, such as all caps or italics, has been used here. We have tried to identify the date of earliest appearance in a newspaper. The newspapers were theIndependent Journal [J], the New-York Packet [P], and the Daily Advertiser [A], all based in New York, shown preceding the date. Nos. 78-85 actually first appeared May 28, 1788, in a bound volume published by J. and A. McLean, Federalist II. We have followed the consensus of scholars on attribution of each paper to its primary author, James Madison [M], John Jay [J], or Alexander Hamilton [H], which is shown following the date.

Contents

1

J

1787

Oct

27

H

General Introduction

2

J

1787

Oct

31

J

Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence

3

J

1787

Nov

3

J

Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (continued)

4

J

1787

Nov

7

J

Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (continued)

5

J

1787

Nov

10

J

Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (continued)

6

J

1787

Nov

14

H

Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States

7

J

1787

Nov

15

H

Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States (continued) and Particular Causes Enumerated

8

P

1787

Nov

20

H

Consequences of Hostilities Between the States

9

J

1787

Nov

21

H

The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection

10

A

1787

Nov

22

M

The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection (continued)

11

J

1787

Nov

24

H

The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy

12

P

1787

Nov

27

H

The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue

13

J

1787

Nov

28

H

Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government

14

P

1787

Nov

30

M

Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered

15

J

1787

Dec

1

H

Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union

16

P

1787

Dec

4

H

Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)

17

J

1787

Dec

5

H

Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)

18

P

1787

Dec

7

M

Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)

19

J

1787

Dec

8

M

Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)

20

P

1787

Dec

11

M

Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)

21

J

1787

Dec

12

H

Other Defects of the Present Confederation

22

P

1787

Dec

14

H

Other Defects of the Present Confederation (continued)

23

P

1787

Dec

18

H

Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union

24

J

1787

Dec

19

H

Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered

25

P

1787

Dec

21

H

Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered (continued)

26

J

1787

Dec

22

H

Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered

27

P

1787

Dec

25

H

Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (continued)

28

J

1787

Dec

26

H

Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (continued)

29

J

1788

Jan

9

H

Concerning the Militia

30

P

1787

Dec

28

H

Concerning the General Power of Taxation

31

P

1788

Jan

1

H

Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)

32

J

1788

Jan

2

H

Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)

33

J

1788

Jan

2

H

Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)

34

J

1788

Jan

5

H

Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)

35

J

1788

Jan

5

H

Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)

36

P

1788

Jan

8

H

Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)

37

A

1788

Jan

11

M

Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government

38

J

1788

Jan

12

M

The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed

39

J

1788

Jan

16

M

Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles

40

P

1788

Jan

18

M

On the Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained

41

J

1788

Jan

19

M

General View of the Powers Conferred by The Constitution

42

P

1788

Jan

22

M

The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered

43

J

1788

Jan

23

M

The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered (continued)

44

P

1788

Jan

25

M

Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States

45

J

1788

Jan

26

M

Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered

46

P

1788

Jan

29

M

The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared

47

J

1788

Jan

30

M

The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts

48

P

1788

Feb

1

M

These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other

49

J

1788

Feb

2

M

Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention

50

P

1788

Feb

5

M

Periodical Appeals to the People Considered

51

J

1788

Feb

6

M

The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments

52

P

1788

Feb

8

M

The House of Representatives

53

J

1788

Feb

9

M

The House of Representatives (continued)

54

P

1788

Feb

12

M

Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives Among the States

55

J

1788

Feb

13

M

The Total Number of the House of Representatives

56

J

1788

Feb

16

M

The Total Number of the House of Representatives (continued)

57

P

1788

Feb

19

M

The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation

58

J

1788

Feb

20

M

Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered

59

P

1788

Feb

22

H

Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members

60

J

1788

Feb

23

H

Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (continued)

61

P

1788

Feb

26

H

Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (continued)

62

J

1788

Feb

27

M

The Senate

63

J

1788

Mar

1

M

The Senate (continued)

64

J

1788

Mar

5

J

The Powers of the Senate

65

P

1788

Mar

7

H

The Powers of the Senate (continued)

66

J

1788

Mar

8

H

Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered

67

P

1788

Mar

11

H

The Executive Department

68

J

1788

Mar

12

H

The Mode of Electing the President

69

P

1788

Mar

14

H

The Real Character of the Executive

70

J

1788

Mar

15

H

The Executive Department Further Considered

71

P

1788

Mar

18

H

The Duration in Office of the Executive

72

J

1788

Mar

19

H

The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered

73

P

1788

Mar

21

H

The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power

74

P

1788

Mar

25

H

The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive

75

J

1788

Mar

26

H

The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive

76

P

1788

Apr

1

H

The Appointing Power of the Executive

77

J

1788

Apr

2

H

The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered

78

J

1788

Jun

14

H

The Judiciary Department

79

J

1788

Jun

18

H

The Judiciary Continued

80

J

1788

Jun

21

H

The Powers of the Judiciary

81

J

1788

Jun

25
28

H

The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority

82

J

1788

Jul

2

H

The Judiciary Continued

83

J

1788

Jul

5
9
12

H

The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury

84

J

1788

Jul

Aug

16
26
9

H

Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered

85

J

1788

Aug

13
16

H

Concluding Remarks

 

 

Source:  http://www.constitution.org/fed/federa00.htm

 

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