Today's Intel

Aug. 14, 2019

REUTERS

President Donald Trump said on Tuesday he was convinced that Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell wants to move legislation to toughen background checks for gun purchases, expressing optimism that Congress will act on the issue.

There is no chance that a trade agreement between the United States and Britain will pass Congress if Brexit undermines the Good Friday peace accord between Ireland and Northern Ireland, U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Wednesday.

A prominent U.S. senator warned China Hong Kong could lose its special U.S. trade status if Beijing intervenes directly to crack down on increasingly violent pro-democracy protests.

Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is considering ending his bid for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination in order to run for his state's U.S. Senate seat, the New York Times reported on Tuesday.

China said Hong Kong's protest movement had reached "near terrorism" on Wednesday, after a night of ugly clashes at the city's airport where demonstrators set upon and detained two men they suspected of being government sympathizers.

Russian security officers armed with automatic rifles searched the Moscow offices of a rights group that represents the interests of Russian nationals in the European Court of Human Rights.

A suicide bomber killed five people, including a Chadian soldier, when she blew herself up on the shores of Lake Chad on Wednesday, three military and government sources said.

Argentina's peso weakened at the open on Wednesday after President Mauricio Macri said he would cut income taxes for workers and boost subsidies for social services following two days of economic turmoil triggered by an election upset by opposition candidate Alberto Fernandez.

Any move by the United States to place new ground-launched, intermediate-range missiles in South Korea could spark a "new Cold War" and an escalating arms race in the region, North Korean state media said on Wednesday.

Dozens of people in New York state who were victims of sexual abuse as children sued the Roman Catholic Church in New York on Wednesday, the first day a new law temporarily enabled them to file lawsuits over decades-old crimes.

Germany's economy went into reverse. China's growth is slowing. And the U.S. bond yield curve has inverted. All of these factors are sowing fears of a coming recession.

AP Top Stories

The market's most closely watched part of the yield curve inverted today, and if its record over the last half-century is any indicator, the U.S. could be headed for a recession.

Portland police are mobilizing to prevent clashes between out-of-state far-right groups planning a rally here and the homegrown anti-fascists who oppose them as America's culture wars seep into this progressive haven.

A deadly explosion at a missile test site last week appears to have been caused by a failed test of a nuclear-powered cruise missile, one Russian President Vladimir Putin boasted about last year.

A 400-year-old temple in Japan is attempting to hot-wire interest in Buddhism with a robotic priest it believes will change the face of the religion -- despite critics comparing the android to "Frankenstein's monster."

Millions of haj pilgrims began heading back to Mecca for final prayers on Tuesday as the world's largest annual gathering of Muslims wound down without incident despite the logistical challenges and escalating regional tensions.

Video of a device built to shoot fish over hydroelectric dams that block their migratory paths resurfaced on Twitter over the weekend.

China's Belt and Road Initiative is seeing a revival lately, after a year of rumblings from developing nations that President Xi Jinping had set them a debt trap in the guise of funding massive infrastructure projects.

Thousands of South Koreans protested outside Japan's embassy in Seoul and city officials unveiled a new memorial to wartime 'comfort women' at the center of a row over the two countries' shared history.

Japan advised more than 300,000 people to evacuate their homes on Wednesday and airlines cancelled hundreds of scheduled flights as a tropical storm bore down on the archipelago.

BBC

Some 600,000 followers from 58 countries have descended on the city of Guadalajara, where La Luz del Mundo has its international headquarters, for their week-long "holy convocation", when leaders hold mass baptisms and a "holy supper".

A court in Belgium is investigating an orphanage for alleged abduction and trafficking of children from the Democratic Republic of Congo. Children were brought to Belgium and adopted by families who had been told they were orphans. Years later, DNA tests have proved that in some cases they were not.

The US is delaying imposing tariffs on some imports from China until 15 December because of "health, safety, national security and other factors".

Three days into a strike, Portuguese fuel tanker drivers have rejected a new government decree requiring them to fulfil minimum services or face arrest or even jail.

WND

The IRS is finally ready to make good on threats to strip U.S. passports from Americans who owe more than $52,000 in overdue taxes.

An elderly federal judge presiding over a key lawsuit relating to financier pedophile Jeffrey Epstein died Sunday, adding another twist to the drawn-out legal saga and to efforts to unseal still-secret details about the conduct of Epstein, his enablers and one of his accusers.

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