Today's Intel

Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011

BLOOMBERG

President Obama said no one should take enjoyment from the images of Muammar Qaddafi's final moments after he was captured while trying to escape.

House Speaker John Boehner is threatening to block legislation to normalize U.S. trade with Russia, as part of its World Trade Organization admission, until it respects the "territorial integrity" of neighboring Georgia.

A new Pentagon audit resolves a lingering Iraq-war mystery, concluding that $6.6 billion of U.S.-controlled reconstruction money was transferred to the Central Bank of Iraq, not lost or stolen.

Rick Perry moved to re-frame the Republican presidential race with a proposal to tear up the tax code and draw a distinction with the more incremental approach of Mitt Romney.

Chancellor Angela Merkel headed to a summit to solve the euro debt crisis armed with the endorsement of the German parliament as Italy's Silvio Berlusconi struggled to meet Europe's demands to cut pension spending.

Argentina ordered oil, gas and mining exporters to repatriate all their export revenue as the government struggles to stem accelerating capital flight in South America's second-biggest economy.

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp will release a long-awaited proposal today to shield 95 percent of corporate profits earned offshore from taxation in the U.S., according to a Republican familiar with the plan.

Thailand's worst floods in more than a half century may have wiped out as much as 14 percent of paddy fields in the world's biggest rice exporter, potentially erasing the predicted global glut.

Orders for U.S. durable goods excluding transportation equipment rose in September by the most in six months, showing manufacturing is supporting the expansion.

German two-year notes rose, while longer-maturity bonds declined, as investors awaited the outcome of a European Union meeting today where leaders may struggle to agree on a plan to contain the debt crisis.

The yen rose to a post-World War II high versus the dollar as concern European leaders will fail to resolve the region's debt crisis boosted demand for the safety of Japan's currency. The euro surged to strongest in more than six-weeks against the dollar after a report that Germany's lower house of parliament voted to expand the region's bailout fund. Australia's dollar weakened against all its major counterparts after a government report showed inflation slowed.

AP Top Stories

Police fired tear gas into a crowd of hundreds of Occupy Oakland protesters who had marched to City Hall to reclaim the camp they'd been evicted from early Tuesday.

With less than a month remaining until its deadline to engineer $1.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the next decade, the Deficit Super Committee has worked exclusively over the past month behind closed doors - out of the public's view to determine whether the panel is making substantial progress. Today, the committee will hold its first open public hearing in more than a month.

A former Goldman Sachs board member surrendered to federal authorities to face criminal charges stemming from a massive hedge fund insider trading case.

The College Board reported today that average in-state tuition and fees at four-year public colleges surged 8.3 percent this fall, just as President Obama released details of his plan to help students deal with a debt burden that has expanded to more than $1 trillion.

BBC

Boeing's Dreamliner finally completes its maiden commercial flight from Tokyo to Hong Kong, after three years of delays.

A US government medical panel recommends the human papilloma virus vaccine for boys, as vaccination rates for young women stagnate.

Canada's Conservative government has introduced legislation to abolish the long-gun registry. The registry requires owners of shotguns and rifles to register the weapons, but when Stephen Harper's Conservative government took power in 2006, they vowed to abolish the law.

The head of Libya's transitional authorities has called for Nato to extend its mission in Libya until the end of the year.

China's minimum wage climbs by 21.7%, official figures show, despite attempts to slow inflation and rein in prices.

Thousands of Filipinos have fled an army offensive against Muslim guerrillas and criminal gangs in the south of the country.

WorldNetDaily

Islamic law, or Shariah, already is being applied in the U.S. court system, according to an extensive new report. A recent Center for Security Policy study called "Shariah Law and American State Courts: An Assessment of State Appellate Court Cases outlines dozens of cases in which the Islamic system of law has been applied.

A Florida appeals court appears to have cleared the way for a Hillsborough judge to use Islamic law to decide a key issue in a lawsuit involving a local mosque.

The Royal Dutch Medical Association (KNMG) has released new guidelines for interpreting the 2002 Euthanasia Act that now includes "mental and psychosocial ailments" such as "loss of function, loneliness and loss of autonomy" as acceptable criteria for euthanasia. The guidelines also allow doctors to connect a patient's lack of "social skills, financial resources and a social network" to "unbearable and lasting suffering," opening the door to legal assisted death based on "psychosocial" factors, not terminal illness.

Consumer confidence unexpectedly dropped to its lowest level in two-and-a-half years in October, while house prices were unchanged at low levels in August, suggesting the consumer is still struggling.

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