Today's Intel

Apr. 17, 2019

REUTERS

President Donald Trump has vetoed a congressional resolution that sought to end U.S. involvement in the Saudi-led war in Yemen, the White House said on Tuesday.

The Trump administration will allow lawsuits in U.S. courts for the first time against foreign companies that use properties confiscated by Communist-ruled Cuba since Fidel Castro's revolution six decades ago, a senior U.S. official said on Tuesday.

Myanmar began releasing more than 9,000 prisoners on Wednesday, with many drug offenders among the first to walk free, but just two political detainees, after the president declared an amnesty on the first day of the traditional New Year.

An array of U.S. companies have told the Trump administration that a citizenship question on the 2020 Census would harm business if it leads to an undercount of immigrants, undermining the data they use to place stores, plan inventory and plot ad campaigns.

Across the United States, drivers, regional operators and industry officials say the $700 billion U.S. trucking sector slipped in late 2018, with the fall continuing into this year. While the decline in freight rates and hauling does not suggest the United States is headed into a recession, that softness is consistent with slippage in the economy as a whole.

Handbags, tractors, shovels and fish are part of an 11-page list of U.S. imports worth $20 billion that the European Union on Wednesday said it could hit with tariffs in a transatlantic aircraft subsidy dispute.

China plans to gamble on the bulk deployment of its untested "Hualong One" nuclear reactor, squeezing out foreign designs, as it resumes a long-delayed nuclear program aimed at meeting its clean energy goals, government and industry officials said.

Satellite images from last week show movement at North Korea's main nuclear site that could be associated with the reprocessing of radioactive material into bomb fuel, a U.S. think tank said.

The U.S. trade deficit fell to an eight-month low in February as imports from China plunged, suggesting President Donald Trump's "America First" agenda was starting to bear fruit.

AP Top Stories

At least 174 people have been killed and 758 wounded in the battle for control over the Libyan capital Tripoli, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.

During a stop in San Bernardino, Gov. Gavin Newsom discussed his plans to add more money to the fight against homelessness.

Ecuador said on Monday it has suffered 40 million cyber-attacks on the webpages of public institutions since stripping WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange of political asylum.

Syria and Iran said Tuesday the United States is waging "economic terrorism" against countries that have different opinions and should pursue its aims through diplomacy instead.

Hundreds of migrants are being held for days in a tent city at a Border Patrol station in a preview of what the Trump administration is reportedly considering to absorb a surge on the border.

In the latest of a seemingly endless string of high-profile hacks, Microsoft confirmed to TechCrunch over the weekend that a "limited" number of people who use Microsoft's email platforms - including Outlook, MSN, and Hotmail - had their accounts compromised.

For about six months now, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has used her briefing room so little that officials might as well turn it back into the swimming pool it was more than a half century ago. But she's not the only one who has abandoned this post. Apparently taking the lead from the White House, the Pentagon has gone more than 300 days since the last time an official spokesperson stood up and gave an on-camera briefing to the press. This is a critical failure by the Department of Defense, which should be able and willing to explain to taxpayers what they are doing with the nearly $700 billion that they are entrusted with each year.

The United States will push its allies at a meeting in Prague next month to adopt shared security and policy measures that will make it more difficult for China's Huawei to dominate 5G telecommunications networks.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday ordered makers of transvaginal surgical mesh implants to immediately stop their sale and distribution in the United States, the latest action by the agency to tackle safety issues related to the devices.

BBC

Schools throughout the city of Denver, Colorado have closed for the day as authorities search for an "extremely dangerous" woman. Sol Pais, 18, is reportedly obsessed with the 1999 Columbine high school massacre, in which two teenagers murdered 12 students and a teacher. The 20th anniversary of the attack is on 20 April. FBI agent Dean Phillips told reporters Ms Pais was a "credible threat to the community". Authorities issued a security warning to schools throughout the Denver area late on Tuesday. Since then, a number of districts have announced closures, including Cherry Creek, Mapleton and Jefferson County.

The first shipment of humanitarian assistance from the international Red Cross is being distributed in Venezuela after it arrived on Tuesday. The shipment comes a few weeks after President Nicolás Maduro reached a deal with the group to deliver aid. The socialist president had previously repeatedly denied the existence of a humanitarian crisis in Venezuela.

Troubled Indian airline Jet Airways has temporarily suspended all its domestic and international flights after failing to find fresh funding.

WND

Chase Bank is shutting down accounts of people and organizations with controversial political views, according to an undercover investigation by James O'Keefe's Project Veritas.

A new poll reveals that less than half (46 percent) of the Christians in the United Kingdom believe in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ for the world's sins.

A survey of 1,000 British children ages 6 to 12 found that one in five didn't know apples grow on trees, while more than 9 in 10 weren't aware that bananas or strawberries came from plants.

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