Today's Intel

Dec. 7, 2018

Remember "a day that will live in infamy". - December 7, 1941.

REUTERS

President Donald Trump said he would nominate State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert as the next U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, choosing a former TV anchor with little policy experience to lead U.S. diplomacy at the international organization.

President Donald Trump said on Friday he had chosen former U.S. Attorney General William Barr to once again lead the Justice Department, a role that is in charge of the probe into Russian election interference and possible collusion between Moscow and the Trump campaign.

President Donald Trump sounded an optimistic note about negotiations with China on trade issues, but did not offer any details in an early morning tweet, as major companies worried about how the arrest of a top Huawei executive would affect relations between Washington and Beijing.

John Kelly is expected to resign as U.S. President Donald Trump's chief of staff in the coming days, CNN reported on Friday, citing unnamed sources.

Heavy rains and the threat of mudslides in Southern California forced the closure of a key coastal highway near Malibu on Thursday and prompted authorities to order evacuations of almost 3,000 residents from hillside areas scarred by recent wildfires.

France hunkered down for another wave of potentially violent protests on Saturday as embattled President Emmanuel Macron planned to address the nation next week over public fury at the high cost of living, senior allies said.

French retailers have lost around 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) in revenue since the start of the "yellow vest" protests in the country last month, the French retail federation (FCD) told Reuters.

Suspected militiamen have killed at least 18 civilians in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, near the epicenter of an Ebola outbreak, an army spokesman said on Friday.

Oil prices jumped more than 5 percent on Friday as big Middle East producers in OPEC agreed to reduce output to drain global fuel inventories and support the market.

AP Top Stories

A Tennessee inmate became the second person to die in the state's electric chair in just over a month Thursday, nearly two decades after Tennessee adopted lethal injection as its preferred method of execution.

America turned into a net oil exporter last week, breaking 75 years of continued dependence on foreign oil and marking a pivotal - even if likely brief - moment toward what U.S. President Donald Trump has branded as "energy independence."

A U.S. attempt to get the United Nations to condemn violence by Palestinian militant group Hamas for the first time failed on Thursday because the draft resolution fell short of votes needed in the General Assembly.

The United Nations warned in October that at least three million people were in "urgent" need of food due to the dry spell mainly across northern and western Afghanistan, and could face famine if they do not get help. "We had a lot of opium and wheat -- we lost them. The land dried up and we didn't have enough to eat."

The chairman and largest investor in Sears Holdings is offering to buy the retailer out of bankruptcy - including 500 of its remaining stores - in what may amount to the chain's last hope to survive its precipitous decline. Sears chairman and hedge fund investor Eddie Lampert, who was also CEO until the retailer's October bankruptcy filing, disclosed the offer Thursday.

Incoming congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez intends to be one of the few lawmakers on Capitol Hill who pay their interns, the New York Democrat said in a tweet Tuesday.

Denmark says it will send unwelcome migrants to a remote island by 2021. The asylum-seekers who would be sent there would be people with criminal records or those who cannot be returned to their home country.

The latest numbers on student loans were all too familiar: Outstanding debt hit another record and delinquency rates spiked in the third quarter, according to Federal Reserve data. What has changed, however, is who is doing the lending. Five years ago, big banks like JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Bank of America were players in the student loan business. Today, the government now makes about 90 percent of all student loans. Financial institutions in the S&P 500 have sliced their loans by $22.5 billion, or 35 percent, in the five years since 2013.

A former South Korean military intelligence chief was found dead on Friday, police said, in a suspected suicide.

BBC

Nearly half of all US adults have had an immediate family member incarcerated at some point in their lives, according to a new study.

At least five hostages, including a child, have died as armed police battled robbers who had tried to raid two banks in north-east Brazil.

Australia has passed controversial laws designed to compel technology companies to grant police and security agencies access to encrypted messages. The government says the laws, a world first, are necessary to help combat terrorism and crime.

Twelve health workers in the Democratic Republic of Congo have died of Ebola, the minister for public health said. They are part of a group of 44 health workers who have been infected with the virus.

China is about to launch the first mission to land robotic craft on the far side of the Moon which never faces Earth.

WND

Residents of Boulder, Colorado who refuse to comply with a state order to "certify" their so-called assault rifles this month could face fines, jail and confiscation of their firearms.

Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash., a public liberal arts college in Washington state facing declining enrollment numbers has decided that placing restrictions on free speech is the best approach to growing enrollment numbers at the school.

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